Air Academy’s Fluffy Quarantine Companions

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Chemistry teacher Rachel Valiquette’s dog Maxwell poses for a picture.

There is no doubt that quarantine has affected everyone in the country. Many individuals are stuck alone in their houses or apartments without any company. This has resulted in students and teachers feeling the strain of being home all day.

The solution for many people has been adopting pets.

Animals really do improve daily life, according to helpguide.org. They keep people active and motivated throughout the week- a difficult task in our altered lifestyle this year.

Playful puppies and fluffy kittens can be a wonderful addition to any household without allergies, especially in a state like Colorado with its numerous hiking trails and exploring opportunities.

Several sites recommend keeping pets from interacting with other people and animals to prevent the spread of covid, but there are many secluded hiking trails in Colorado Springs that sidestep this concern. There’s still plenty of places for pet owners to explore- as long as they’re willing to take their pets out at all.

English teacher Kaite Klostermann’s dog Zoe grins during playtime.
Theatre director Susan Manst’s dog Dakota poses on a table.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The glaring downside to adopting a pet during quarantine is commitment.

“Her previous family didn’t have the time or energy to take good care of her, so she was put in a shelter,” said English teacher Katie Klostermann about her recently adopted dog, Zoe.

Right now, many people are adopting pets without really understanding how to take care of them. When the virus passes, many animals will end up back in a shelter.

A pet is a long-term commitment that many people aren’t prepared to make. So while it may seem like a good idea, it isn’t a decision that should be made lightly.

Before adopting a pet, consider how much attention you can give them right now and what kind of exercise you normally do. Dogs require an active lifestyle, so they can be great for people who are on the go and eager to get back to exercising away from their homes.

For less physically active people, a cat can be a much better choice. Cats, while independent, still require plenty of attention. If you can provide the care they deserve, adopting a cat is a wonderful choice.

Chemistry teacher Rachel Valiquette’s cat Zara takes a nap on a cat tree.

“I have a 6-year-old dog named Maxwell, a 4-year-old cat named Zara, and a 3-year-old cat named Mira. My favorite thing about all of my pets is just how loving they are. No matter what they are always there to greet me at the door and always waiting for cuddles,” said chemistry teacher Rachel Valiquette, whose home is full of furry friends.

Animals can make a house a home, especially at this time when many people are forced to spend more time there than ever before. If adopting a pet was planned before quarantine, then it’s an excellent option for families and individuals.

“It’s true we got her during quarantine,” admitted Klostermann, “but we’ve wanted a dog for a while now. She definitely keeps us entertained, gets us outside and active, and is a sweet little companion.”

There are many places in Colorado Springs to adopt a pet, including All Breed Rescue and Training, a shelter that takes in dogs that are in danger of being euthanized due to behavioral issues. They rehabilitate dogs so that they can be a loving part of any family that adopts them.

Adopting a pet requires patience and attention, but it also requires plenty of supplies for both dogs and cats. As long as they’re prepared for the responsibility, adopting a pet can brighten up anyone’s life.